Jump to content

Recommended Posts

купиль коропку в питере от рт за 27 рублей. на выходных буду разбирать и собирать

летать теперь будешь???

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

С хера? Она такая же, как и моя ))

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Там редукторы отличаются передаточными?!

 @stass,

А может просто воткнуть, зачем перебирать?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Там редукторы отличаются передаточными?!

 @stass,

А может просто воткнуть, зачем перебирать?

видимо уже стояла от РТ  ;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

уже стояла от РТ

нет

 

А может просто воткнуть, зачем перебирать?

в нее до меня лазили, необходимо проинспектировать

 

Там редукторы отличаются передаточными?

неть

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

о, поздравляю! нашлась значит коробочка.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Стас, это значит ты так и не попал на Байкал...обидно конечно...я б тоже ЛГ назвал за такое :)  :unsure:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

ты так и не попал на Байкал

тю, да мне этот ваш байкал надоел уж :D

в этом годе по алтаю пробзделса, а коробка наебнэ на обратном пути  :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Чтобы не потерять, кину статейку в эту тему о 6-ступенчатой коробке и её модификациях. Правда на английском. Внизу есть расшифровки по различным коробкам.
Взято отсюда: http://largiader.com/tech/oiltrans/sixspeed.html 
Там есть фотки и две очень полезные таблички, которые как сюда  перенести не знаю. Было бы здорово эти две таблички с расшифровкой букв номера коробки и передаточными отношениями сюда сохранить.
 

Early 6-speed transmissions

(As published in OTL)

The same basic transmission was installed on the R1100S, K1200RS/LT/GT, R1200C, and all R1150 models (the second-generation Oilheads and K-bikes with Motronic 2.4 and the revised pushbutton switchgear).

Externally, the housings are different for the K1200 due to different engine mounting, and for the R1200C and R1100S because of the swingarm mounting.

Internally there are also some model-specific differences. The reverser mechanism on the K1200LT occupies the space where 5th gear usually lives, so there are only five speeds in all (the 4th gear ratio is changed to better bridge the gap). R1200C prior to the CL also came with only five speeds because BMW skipped 5th.

However, the overall design and shifting mechanism are common to all of these versions. This transmission design is unique in that it uses a dedicated gear just to drive the intermediate shaft, so the intermediate typically has seven gears in all (in other gearboxes, the input shaft drives the top gear). As on previous boxers since the /2 and possibly before, the drive gear is helical and all of the others are straight-cut.

This article only shows the six-speed versions.

Shifting

6sp.jpgFirst let's take a brief look at the parts that do the shifting. The selector is basically the shift lever. When you rock the shifter up and down, it moves this back and forth. There's a ratcheting mechanism that turns the shift drum about 1/8 turn every time you shift.

The shift drum has a groove for each shift fork, so in each of its seven positions (including neutral) the shift forks are in different positions.

The three shift forks slide on rails and move according to their groove on the shift drum. Two of the forks are identified by arrows in the picture, and the third is on the other side of the drum.

 

 

 

shafts.jpgshafts.gif

Shafts and gears

At the bottom is the input shaft with the clutch spline on the left. This is where the power comes in, and it drives the intermediate shaft via the helical (angled-tooth) gear. The stuff on the rear part of the input shaft is a shock coupling which lets the gear twist to absorb driveline shock.

The gear pairs of the intermediate shaft (center) and output shaft (top) are in constant mesh. One gear in each pair freewheels on its shaft and is engaged by locking against a neighboring gear which cannot freewheel on its shaft.

On the intermediate shaft, for example, 4th and 3rd gears act as one part, splined so they can slide sideways on the shaft but not spin. They slide to the right to lock 5th gear to the shaft, and slide to the left to lock 6th gear to the shaft (shown in the diagram). The square engagement dogs for locking the gears together can be seen between 6 & 4 and between 3 & 5. Between the two gears you can see the groove for the shift fork which does the sliding work.

The output shaft gears have similar grooves and engagement dogs. 6th gear slides to the left to engage 2nd, and to the right to engage 4th. 5th gear slides to the left to engage 3rd and to the right to engage 1st.

All of these combinations obviously rely on only one gear engagement happening at once. For instance, in the diagram the shift fork (arrow) is pushing the 3-4 intermediate gear to the left, locking 6 to the shaft. Because the mating 6 is splined to the output shaft, power is transmitted from intermediate to output. 1, 2, 3 and 4 on the output will be spinning freely, as will 5 on the intermediate. If the intermediate 3-4 gear moves back to center, the intermediate 6th is once again free to spin and therefore will be unable to transmit power. The shift drum is what choreographs the engagements of the various shift dogs. The drum rotates and moves the three shift forks which each move a gear. Two forks must always be centered so that their gears don't engage on either side.

So when you're riding down the road, all of the gears are turning but only one pair has both gears locked to their shafts. The others all have one gear, on the intermediate or on the output, that are turning at a different speed than the shaft is. Locking this gear to the shaft during a shift - bringing it to the same speed - is the clunk you sometimes notice.

Before you read farther, try to visualize what's happening in neutral, at a standstill with the engine running. Ready? OK, the input shaft is spinning the intermediate, through the drive gear. So the intermediate is turning, meaning that the 1, 2, and 3-4 gears are spinning with it. They in turn are spinning their freewheeling counterparts on the output shaft. The output shaft, though, isn't turning because the rear wheel isn't, so 5 and 6 on the output are also stationary (because they are splined to it). Their counterparts on the intermediate shaft are therefore stationary, with the intermediate shaft spinning away inside them.

Shimming is mentioned constantly with transmissions and final drives. What is it? Usually when shafts are supported by bearings in any kind of housing, the amount of axial room that the shaft has to move in is controlled by shims of some sort. In the past I talked about this in final drives, so this is the transmission part.

Transmission housings are two parts, a case and a cover. Sort of like a jar and a lid, except the seam between them can be anywhere, meaning that you can have equally-sizes halves if the designer wants. Nevertheless, the larger half is considered the case and the smaller half is the cover. All three shafts of these (and most other) transmissions are held by ball bearings, one end in the case and one in the cover, and shims are added somewhere to eliminate the extra space. Traditionally, measurements for shimming have been done like this:

Traditional shimming [this can be a sidebar or taken out of the main stream, as it is background info].

With traditional shimming, the shafts are installed intocase.jpg

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Then the corresponding depths in the cover are measured. For each shaft, the two dimensions are compared to determine what amount of shim thickness is required to reduce the end play to within specification. These shims are usually added to the holes in the cover where the shaft bearings fit.

cover.jpg

This has all changed with the six-speed. With the new method, actual measurements involving the cover and housing (as shown in the pictures) are things of the past; the cases and covers are assumed to be a given dimension and the shaft assemblies are built to a preset length using shims under the bearings.

As you can imagine, proper shimming therefore depends on the cases being made to specification. Is this happening? It depends on what you want to accept. The allowable variation in shaft assembly length is 0.05mm, and shims are available in increments of 0.025mm (this is really a very small increment by any standard, but this is BMW). Using the input shaft bearing bores as an example, the depth I have measured on covers varied by 0.03mm and the cases varied by 0.06mm, for a total possible variation (with these components) of 0.09mm. Figured the same way, the intermediate and output shaft bores also varied by 0.09mm.

So you might think that the variation in the housings overcomes the required shimming precision. Numerically it does, but in reality, these trannies are not subject to the same shimming-related problems that befell the 5-speeds. Rounded shift dogs and worn forks just don't happen. These are very robust transmissions.

The 6-speed shift drum (left) has deeper grooves than the 5-speed one.

drums.jpg

The six-speed shift fork (left) is much stiffer than the five-speed one.

forks.jpg

The EVO 6-speed

There was one design change during the life of this transmission. The EVO transmission was introduced on Boxers for the 2003 model year and on K1200RS/GT for 2004.

EVO gears are narrower with a deeper profile. The shift forks have teflon bushings to help them slide on the shift rods, and the selector assembly is cut differently (better finish on the ratchet and different material thicknesses). Due to the width change, the EVO gearset is lighter at 7.8kg versus 8.4kg for the earlier version. Earlier bikes with shifting difficulties can be upgraded with the newer selector shaft. The gears and forks are upgradeable also, but not cost-effectively.

EVO forks (left) slide on the shaft with teflon bushings.

evoforks.jpg

The EVO gears (left) are narrower, reducing the weight of the gearbox. The difference in tooth profile is imperceptible.

evoshafts.jpg

The EVO selector shaft assembly has a different cutout profile in the ratchet mechanism.

evoselector.jpg

The three main housing types are R1100S/R1200C, R1150, and K1200. There are two first gear ratios and two 6th gear ratios, two colors (R1150 only) and of course the EVO update. These details can be seen in the suffix of the gearbox ID code.

FAA - 2002 K12RS
HAA - early silver K12LT 
GAA - 98, 99, early R1200C BB, BB, DM 
GAB - 99, 99, 00 silver R1100S BB, BB, EH 
JGB - TPC 1st replacement R1100S silver
JBC - TPC 2nd replacement R1100S silver
GAE - early silver R1150GS
GAF - black R1200C (eBay) 
GBE - 02 silver R1150RT fluidj

GAL - 02 silver Roadster tall 6th Phil Kavanaugh 
GAL - 02, early silver R1150R tall 6th BB, Mihalka
GAN - 02 Adventure

JAE - 03 R1200CL silver on eBay
JAH - black 
JAK - 03 black sport GS Neil
JAL - EVO silver Adv. 
JAM - 03 black Adventure, RT-P
JAR - Rockster, black (supposedly Sport) 
JAS - 04 silver R1150R tall 6th
GAB on eBay, not from an S?

GAE => up to 2003, silver, normal 1st, Serie (= long 6th)
GAF => up to 2003, black R1200C 
GAG => up to 2003, black, std
GAJ => up to 2003, silver, normal 1st, short 6th
GAK => up to 2003, black, normal 1st, short 6th
GAN => up to 2003, silver, short 1st and short 6th (only GSA)
GAP => up to 2003, black, short 1st and short 6th (only GSA)

JAE => EVO silver R1200CL
JAH => EVO black standard 
JAJ => EVO silver Sport
JAK => EVO black Sport
JAL => EVO silver Enduro
JAM =>EVO black Enduro
JAR => EVO Rockster Sport
JAS => EVO silver standard 

 

Ratios

The Enduro gearbox (lower 1st and 6th) was used on the GS Adventure and supposedly on some R1150RT-P authority bikes. The lower 6th by itself was the basis for the Sport gearbox, and was used on the R1150GS Sport, some R1150R and R1200C models, and most K1200 models (where it acts like 5th on the LT).

The EVO ratios weren't significantly different. Some EVO gear pairs had different numbers of teeth than pre-EVO, but the ratios were within half a percent of the originals.

 

How can I have both the low first and the tall sixth?

Changing a gear ratio means replacing the gear on the output shaft and replacing the entire intermediate shaft with one having the ratios you want, totalling about $1100 to $1150 in parts plus seven to ten hours of labor in all. However, there were no transmissions produced with the short first and the tall sixth, so there simply is no intermediate shaft available for that combination.

Creating the aforementioned ratio involves building a custom intermediate shaft. The first gear wheel is machined as part of the shaft, so you will have to start with the intermediate shaft from an enduro transmission. At the other end, the second and drive gears are pressed on, so they have to be pressed off using about 15 tons of force. Once they're removed, the sixth gear wheel can be replaced by one from a standard transmission, and then the two end gears are pressed back into place. Of course, this means you need to have a donor intermediate shaft to supply the tall sixth gear.

I've done several of these conversions.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Взято с " Advrider"а. Передаточные числа разных коробок 1150х Гусей:

Gear Ratios (ABS)
1st: 2.045:1
2nd 1.600:1
3rd 1.267:1
4th 1.038:1
5th 0.900:1
6th 0.679:1

Gear Ratios (Sport)
1st: 2.045:1
2nd 1.600:1
3rd 1.267:1
4th 1.038:1
5th 0.900:1
6th 0.800:1

Gear Ratios (Adventure)
1st: 2.375:1
2nd 1.600:1
3rd 1.267:1
4th 1.038:1
5th 0.900:1
6th 0.800:1

Получается только у коробки Adv. короткая первая.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

А вот меня больше напрягает слишеом длинная шестая))) 

Первые пять отщелкиваются на раз,  врубаешь бодро шестую,  а мот начинает колбасить) 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
11 часов назад, Mistral сказал:

А вот меня больше напрягает слишком длинная шестая))) 

Первые пять отщелкиваются на раз,  врубаешь бодро шестую,  а мот начинает колбасить)  

Почему?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

А вот диссонанс такой получается.  Первые пять передач отщелкиваются очень быстро.  Фактически переключения делаешь после одного небольшого движения  ручки газа: первая-газ-вторая-газ и т. д.  В городе пятая - абсолютно нормально применимая скорость.  Но по моим личным внутренним ощущениям на пятой хочется переключиться на 80км/ч. А шестая на этой скорости нормально не берет.  Мотоцикл не хочет разгоняться и сильно вибрирует.  И получается в бодром рисунке разгона затык,  который всегда заметен.  Потому что стараешься обязательно контролировать по спидометру,  перевалил за 90 и можно переключиться или еще не стоит. При чем вибрации на шестой на низких оборотах настолько существенны,  что я предполагаю,  они однажды стали причиной того,  что открутилась гайка шкива генератора и срезало резьбу штока в дальняке.  Это был первый сезон и я ездил не обращая внимания на эти вибрации. 

Хотя для решения этой проблемы я бы предпочел не укорачивать шестую,  а немного пропорционально удлинить оставшиеся со 2 по 5ю. Тем более у гуся большекубатурный и тяговитый двигатель..

А вот с длинной первой я проблем и не ощущал никогда.  Не припомню,  чтобы это доставило мне какие то негатмвные ощущения.  В грязи не залезаю. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Я бы вообще сказал,  что это практически единственная вещь в моем мотоцикле,  которая мне не нравится.  В остальном и придраться не к чему.  Есть еще плохая вибрация после 4 тыс,  которая реально после протяженной езды на высокой скорости влияет на руки,  но я крайне редко так езжу и практически не сталкиваюсь с этим. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 час назад, Mistral сказал:

  Но по моим личным внутренним ощущениям на пятой хочется переключиться на 80км/ч.

При чем вибрации на шестой на низких оборотах настолько существенны,  что я предполагаю,  они однажды стали причиной того,  что открутилась гайка шкива генератора и срезало резьбу штока в дальняке. 

Есть еще плохая вибрация после 4 тыс,  которая реально после протяженной езды на высокой скорости влияет на руки,  но я крайне редко так езжу и практически не сталкиваюсь с этим. 

 

Я обычно тоже переключаюсь на 6ю на  80 км/ч. Каких-то особых вибраций не отметил, или мне после XR-600R уже никакие вибрации не заметны))). Но если  это так мешает, можно в городе ездить на 5й, заодно и динамика получше будет, а разница в расходе минимальная, если она вообще почувствуется.

Когда начал ездить на 600кубовой одностволке, жена сказала, что я без "Локтайт"а  уже и за сигаретами не хожу.

Опять же, когда сел на XR-600R (там действительно жёсткие вибрации), вдруг отметил, что после 1,5-2х часов езды просто "сушит" руки. В жизни такого не было. При том, что в молодости занимался мотокроссом и езжу уже далеко не первый день, то есть считал, что с посадкой у меня всё в порядке. Стал при езде специально обращать внимание, чтобы руки были расслаблены (что правильно, естественно не в ущерб безопасности). Через пару дней это вошло в привычку и проблем больше не было.

А вообще, если вибрации такие сильные, может дело в синхронизации?

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ну я в городе и езжу на 5ой, это понятно.   Но я вообще по городским делам и на работу не езжу практически.  Просто этот затык всегда вызывает дискомфорт у меня. 

А что касается вибраций,  то это было,  по сути,  только однажды: ехали по платной ленинградке и там в течении достаточно долгого времени держали больше 130. И тогда я первый раз понял,  что значит "сушит руки". На заправке остановились и было заметно некомфортно.  Но,  как и говорил,  я так быстро никогда не езжу.  По этому почти не доставляет неудобств. 

А так,  мот синхронится не меньше чем раз в 10 тыс.  Первоначально в бмвбоксерклубе.  Когда сам стал,  то чаще раза в два.  Клапана регулируются по регламенту.  Как у других с вибрациями дело обстоит,  я не знаю,  не с чем сравнивать. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Уменя вибрации начинаются около 130,но после 140-145станавится терпимо. Т.е есть диапазон, который хочется быстрее проскочить. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

А я в тот диапазон выше 145 никогда и не захожу

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×